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Standards
Scaffolding Applications

Question:
Is certification of anchors required?

Answer:
The ANSI/IWCA I-14.1 Window Cleaning Safety Standard, Sec. 8 Inspection and Testing, para. 8.1.1 Newly Installed Equipment, states: “Before initial use by window cleaner(s), the following equipment (as provided for a specific building) shall be successfully demonstrated by the vendor with the rated load under the complete range of operation and so be certified.”

The ANSI/IWCA I-14.1 Window Cleaning Safety Standard, Sec. 3.9 Anchorages, also states: “Building owners and window cleaning contractors shall not allow suspended work to be performed unless it has been determined that the building has provided, identified, and certified anchorages…”

Although the ANSI/IWCA I-14.1 Window Cleaning Safety Standard is a voluntary standard, it is an industry consensus standard that has been cited by OSHA compliance officers and in litigation when a window cleaner has been hurt or killed.


Question:
To what standard can anchors be certified?

Answer:
Rope descent systems and other suspended access systems can be certified to the ANSI/IWCA I-14.1 Window Cleaning Safety Standard. This standard is an accepted industry standard and testing criteria (see Section 8).

Some examples of other standards and applicable regulations include:

  • OSHA Standard Interpretation “Procedures and precautions for employees using descent control equipment.” (04/07/1999)
  • OSHA Regulations (Standards-29 CFR) 1910.28 Safety Requirements for Scaffolding.
  • OSHA Regulations (Standards-29 CFR) 1910.66 Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance.
  • ANSI/ASME A120.1 Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance
    Note: Some states and municipalities (e.g. State of California and New York, City of Chicago) have additional requirements that apply to window cleaning equipment.

Question:
Does having anchorages certified to OSHA 1910.66 mean that the entire building is safe for rope descent and window cleaning operations?

Answer:
Not necessarily. This regulation specifically applies to “Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance.” (Click HERE to see the interpretation letter.)

Although this standard states that anchorages are required to be capable of supporting 5,000 pounds, it does not address anchor spacing issues. Anchor spacing issues are addressed in the ANSI/IWCA I-14.1 Window Cleaning Safety Standard. Proper anchor spacing is critical to providing a safe working environment. (See Minimum requirements for rope descent systems.)


Question:
What load capacity should suspended access equipment be certified to?

Answer:
The manufacturer should be consulted since load capacity varies.
Summit Anchor Co. load capacities are as follows:

Anchors and Rigging Sleeves:
1,000 lbs. Allowable load (Typical. Must be based on hoist capacity
in suspended scaffold applications)
2,000 lbs. Test load
5,000 lbs. Ultimate load

Davits:
1,000 lbs. Allowable load (Typical. Must be based on hoist capacity
in suspended scaffold applications)
2,000 lbs. Test load
4,000 lbs. Ultimate load

Monorails:

1,000 lbs. Allowable load
1,250 lbs. Operational Test load

See Summit Anchor Co. specifications for more information.


Question:
How can building managers and owners determine if their existing roof equipment is in compliance with current standards?

Answer:
Summit Anchor Co. can perform an on-site review of your suspended maintenance equipment to determine if your current equipment is in compliance with safety standards. Our rooftop review will be supported by a written report with recommendations for any modifications. Contact us for details.


Question:
What is the purpose of a log book and is it required?

Answer:
ANSI/IWCA I-14.1 Window Cleaning Safety Standard, Sec. 7.3.2, states: “Log books shall be established and maintained; one that is on file at the building for equipment and anchorages dedicated to the building and one kept by the window cleaner for his transportable equipment, recording each major maintenance activity, the date of the maintenance activity, and signature of the inspector.

 

 

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